Brendan Enrick

Daily Software Development

The Clean Coder Review

I recently read The Clean Coder: A Code of Conduct for Professional Programmers (Robert C. Martin Series), and it is one of the best books on software development that I’ve ever read. The book is a quick read from Uncle Bob Martin and is comparable in size to his similarly named, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship.

The book goes through many, many examples from the author’s development experiences. It has sample discussions between parties to explain points and really goes over professionalism in software development.

The Title

The impression I have about why the book is called “The Clean Coder” is mostly a play on professional developers wanting to have clean code. This doesn’t just mean the code, the code is included of course, but it also means that the whole coding experience and the whole project should be clean.

There are a lot of mistakes that developers can make, and the book is covering them and discussing how to keep things clean.

The Material

Without jumping into too much of the meat of the book, I will say that there are many things in the book that I’ve done before and don’t do anymore. There were some things mentioned that I’ve done recently, and I am going to make sure I never do again. There are some things in there that I’ve thankfully never done, and I hope I don’t ever do them.

The book focuses on a lot of bad situations, why these situations are bad, and how we should really be handling things.

Consider this book to be a guidebook of suggestions for how to act as a professional. For example, in the book’s discussion of estimation, instead of focusing on how to be more accurate with estimation, it covers how you should be estimating. This means that it tells you that you should be very clear about things being estimates, not to imply a commitment, and not to make commitments if you cannot meet them.

Controversial Points

The Clean Coder makes some recommendations that I am sure that plenty of people will disagree with, and the way some points are worded cause me to sometimes disagree as well, but I don’t think it really takes away from the value of the book.

One example of this type of suggestion is that you work 40 hours a week and then another 20 each week on improving your career, leaving 56 hours for sleeping and 52 hours for everything else. It’s presented as doing this makes you a professional and not doing it is not professional. What I disagree with is the definite amount of time. I think it’s important for people to work on their careers, but 20 hours is arbitrary here. Someone may get the same value out of 10 hours that requires me 30 hours. There also is no definitive line between professionalism and unprofessionalism. There are some gray areas, and I believe this would be one of them.

Some things in the book were kept clear that it’s how he works, and I took these as suggestions to learn how I work and make sure that I am evaluating a possible issue.

In this case, I am referring to a point on music. Some people listen to music lightly while programming. This is even true when pair programming. I sometimes like having a very light bit of background buzz from music while pairing. In this case, I keep it so quiet that we can still communicate easily. The book seems to be against music, since it distracts and changes the author’s thinking. For me, I think I don’t have this issue because my pairing partner prevents a change in thinking. I also try to listen to music with foreign lyrics or no lyrics at all. It also helps to not distract from the task at hand. The value here for me is that I should be evaluating and thinking about how I am doing things to make sure that something as seemingly inconsequential as music is not detracting from my work.

Meetings

One great suggestion made by Uncle Bob is that it’s OK to decline a meeting invite. I think that’s very important to understand. Unless you’re really needed in the meeting, you should try not to attend. Meetings take up time, and if it’s less important than your other work, you shouldn’t be attending.

I had a meeting I scheduled yesterday. I invited 8 people to that meeting. I made sure it was clear that if you had something to bring up, you should attend the meeting, otherwise your attendance was not required. We had 4 people in the meeting, and I think 1 of the attendees need not have been there anyway.

Trying

You should read the section on trying. It’s important not to try, and this book makes it very clear why. If you’re going to try, you’re making a commitment to try.

Mentoring

The first paragraph on the chapter on mentoring illustrates one of the biggest shortfalls of the software development industry. I owe a lot of my successes as a developer to the mentoring that I’ve received through books, blogs, and any other recorded sources of information I can get my hands on. I was also lucky enough to have a mentor and a role model to learn from as I became a better developer.

Summary

If you go in to this book expecting it to be a recipe for success, you will be mistaken. This book is fantastic, but it’s important to think and consider why it’s valuable. It is one developer’s experience as a developer.

From his own stories, he is a developer who has hit some pretty rough patches and made some terrible mistakes. That’s a good thing! It means that he has learned a lot!

While reading the book, I never felt like it was forcing his way of doing things onto me. It is presented in a great way to inspire changes in the developers who read the book. You don’t have to do the same things that he is doing, but try to consider what the right answer should be.

The examples are simplified for the book, and business are more complex than what is in the examples. The reader will need to adjust and make decisions, but that’s what you should be doing anyway. Think about being professional and doing what you should be doing.

This book has been on my intended reading list for a while, and now I am going to recommend it to other people.

Well done, Uncle Bob. Thank you for sharing your experience with everyone.

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