Brendan Enrick

Daily Software Development

Agile Resources - Development Process Recurring Steps

Different processes are used to create software applications. Agile software development is about responding and embracing change. It is about working closely with the customer instead of the customer just saying what they want up front. Agile teams follow processes during development, but they’re flexible, quick processes which allow the continue to continue making advances.

Most agile processes involve some sort of iterative development. Iterating allows for quick changes in the allocation of developer resources, which means responding to changes when the response is needed. The following is a list of each iterating piece of the development process grouped by how often the step occurs.

Months

Releases – if you’re working on an application end users will need to update when you release then your releases will likely be done in terms of months. Releases will include collections of features as well as bug fixes. Planning a release means selecting the features you’ll want to complete within the release time period. This is not specifics, but is only a large scale decision of what features will be worked on most of the iteration. (This plan needs to be flexible as it will likely change.)

Weeks

Iterations – an iteration usually lasts one or two weeks and is the primary development cycle for the application. During an iteration planning meeting, the team and the product owner will collaboratively decide which stories will be completed within the iteration. Everyone will decide and commit to achieving these goals. Iterations short, planning session as well as a short retrospective at the end. This communication keeps the team on the same page and allows the process to change as needed.

Minor Releases – if your application allows for it, which means that your application doesn’t require an update on everyone’s computer, an update should be released with every iteration. Keeping releases small makes them a lot easier and less likely to cause problems.

Days

Standing Meeting – during this meeting no one should sit down. It should take only a few minutes, so there is no need to be sitting. This is a great time for everyone to let others know of their progress as well as their plans for the rest of the day. This is a great time to inform everyone of any issues as well as to get questions answered which have quick answers. These help keep everyone in the loop, so no members are left out.

Hours

Change Pair Programmers – I believe highly in pair programming. From what I’ve seen, it produces much higher quality code. The system works best when pairs are changed in terms of hours. The pair needs to work together long enough to avoid the costs of context switching and often enough that knowledge and technique is spread thoroughly in the application and the team.

Minutes

Unit Tests – I think everyone should be unit testing. These should be written all the time and you should be writing your next unit test within minutes of your previous one. These should be written quickly and easily. The challenge of unit testing is getting to a point where the testing is easy. Once writing tests is easy, you’re testing “the right way”.

Code Commits – commit your changes frequently. A lot can happen to a code base in an hour. Keep checking in frequently. It shouldn’t be so often that it impairs your work, but you really only want to be impacting a handful of files. Long periods between commits mean they’re large and difficult to manage. If you have to write more than one thing in the description of your commit, you’re probably committing too much. (The Single Responsibility Principle should apply to code commits as well.)

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