Brendan Enrick

Daily Software Development

Agile Planning with Fewer Stakeholder Fights

If you’ve ever had a team responding to the needs of multiple stakeholders I am sure you’ve seen some interesting trends. Some stakeholders will sit quietly and have their requests ignored while others will always push their needs to the front. This of course happens in a lot of different fields. There are always the pushy people who want their stuff done first, because it’s “top priority”. Maybe it is, but that’s not for the team to decide.

So how can you prevent problems from arising from this type of behavior?

I recommend that you spread as much information about things as possible. In the past I’ve found that when dealing with decision makers it is best to make them aware of the other things you’re working on. If your team has an informative workspace that makes available all of the tasks you’re working on they’ll be able to see what is currently being worked on.

Keep your backlog of tasks in priority order and make the whole thing visible. Make sure also that adding something to the front will require physically moving another task back. It’s much harder to ignore the displacement of someone else’s request when that request must be physically moved.

Another great way of handling this is to make sure all of the stakeholders are present when ordering the list of tasks. This will make it quite clear if one person’s requests are all being put at the front of the line, and can help allow for some compromises to occur instead of an argument.

Disagreements over whose need is more important are not the place for the development team to be involved.I’m not saying that a fist fight will break out, but you want to avoid upsetting anyone. Your best situation is when you don’t have to make a decision about whose task to work on. I find that people are more considerate of other people’s needs when they’re made visible, so make sure that stakeholders see the displacement of another’s work.

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