Brendan Enrick

Daily Software Development

Making The Software Craftsmanship Calendar Images

In case you missed it, Steve Smith, Michelle Smith, and I are Kickstarting the 2016 Software Craftsmanship Calendar. Make sure to support and share the project so that this awesome calendar can make a comeback! We are dedicated to making this happen, but need your support.

This will be our fifth calendar, so we’ve got a lot of practice. None of us work together anymore, so we didn’t have a company backing the 2015 calendar. As a result, it didn’t happen. We’re going to fix that for all of the people who were contacting us and others related to the calendar trying to get their 2015 editions; the 2016 calendar is for all of you. I know it’s really early to be thinking about buying a new calendar, but there a printing deadlines, so we really do make these calendars in the summer. As a result of our efforts, those of you who were lucky enough to have the 2012 or 2014 editions of the Software Craftsmanship calendar got to have a picture of me up on your wall for an entire month for each of those two years! I have no idea if I’ll make it into the 2016 calendar, but it will see be awesome. Here are the pictures I was in!

Death March


Mushroom Management


In the spirit of explaining what goes into making each of these calendar images, I’ve decided to write a post here showing how the Mushroom Management photo got the way it is.

Step 1 – A Principle or Anti-Principle

We always start with some principle that we want to make. There are so many to choose from that we have to trim the list down to any we can get an idea for. That means that we start by brainstorming ideas, and keep the principles that we got any ideas for. It doesn’t matter how good the idea is. If we could come up with a visual we keep it and continue working on the visual. We have this set of criteria for the visuals:

  • The image has to relate to the principle.
  • The image has to be interesting enough to have on a wall for a month.
  • The image should have a humorous aspect to it.

Step 2 – Sketch the Idea to Make Sure It Works

Before we make any props, find a location, and start taking pictures, we have to make sure the idea will actually work. We also want to know what we need to set up. Not all ideas require this, but it helps choose between multiple ideas. It’s also a great point to iterate on before we start shooting. Often the sketches only resemble the image, which is why we spiked the idea with a sketch first.

Mushroom Management Sketches



Golden Hammer 2.0 Sketches



Frankencode Sketch


Step 3 – Make Any Required Props

The golden hammers we’ve used over the years were all made by us. We’ve made 4 different hammers over the years. Only two of them made it into calendar images. Two hammers were real hammers that we painted gold. One was a plastic hammer painted gold. The one featured in the 2014 calendar that looked like something Thor might wield was custom made by our designer Weston. He sculpted it, painted it, and even cut and wrapped the leather for the hilt.

The Original Hammer


The Thor Hammer


And this is how the hammer was made:



Step 4 – Start  Photographing

Perhaps the most obvious part of the process, we do have to take some pictures. We make sure to take quite a few pictures (including some making of pictures to go in the back of the calendar). For the Mushroom Management photos, we did a photo shoot, and the photos were not quite right. We knew we needed to make some changes Take a look:


We really thought that the team needed to look like they’d been sitting in that room for weeks, so we did some thrift store shopping and obtained some visually “interesting” shirts for the team to wear. We also wanted to Mushroom Manager to look a little more formal. We shot again the next day. That got us here:


Step 5 – Touching Up Some Lines

And to make things look amazing, our designer takes these images and makes them complete. OK, so it’s a bit more than just a few lines, but the work he does is fantastic. We’ve gone from an empty office to a development dungeon.


Step 6 – Choosing Behind the Scenes Photos

Our developers in that pictures are in fact developers, not actors. They’re actually pretty uncomfortable in that room. They’re sitting on the floor, closed in a room, with the air conditioning off in the August heat. Being the mushroom manager, I’m supposed to be comfortable, so I’m making sure to stay cool. That’s why I made sure to wear the lightest pair of shorts I owned for this shot.


That’s how you really class-up an outfit right there. worn athletic shoes and blue shorts go really well with a sport coat, shirt, and tie. Trust me!

Step 7 – Enjoying the Calendar

Yes, this is our favorite part as well. When we get to see our first, fully printed calendar. It’s amazing to see thousands of hours of work come to life in the form of a calendar. Yes, we know the number of hours that go into these. NimblePros was in the software consulting business, so we tracked the hours we billed toward our internal projects like these.

Help us make the 2016 Software Craftsmanship calendar, so you can also enjoy smiling, laughing, and being reminded of all of the ways that you can fail at making software or working as a team!

2016 Software Craftsmanship Calendar

At then end of 2014, I wrote an article about the 2015 Software Craftsmanship Calendar that we were not able to make. The best news I have for you is that we’re doing a Software Craftsmanship Calendar for 2016, but we want to make sure that we are able to cover the costs of making the artwork and printing the calendars. The cost per calendar comes down as we print more, so we’re doing a Kickstarter for the 2016 calendar to make sure that we don’t take a big loss by printing the calendars.

Previous Calendar Topics

I’ve written articles about topics from previous years. You can read about those and see the pictures below.

Go back the 2016 Software Craftsmanship Kickstarter and get a calendar for yourself and some for other developers who need them!

Join Our Team

You are correct. I don’t usually do recruiting posts on my blog, however, I am guessing that my blog readers are people who might be interested in working with me. I joined Clear Measure a couple of months ago, which is a company started by Jeffrey Palermo and Mark Stavrou. Primarily based in Austin, we are starting to build a pocket of developers in Northeast Ohio. Our team up here is currently remote, but we are hoping to get enough people to merit some suburban office space for our team.

Let me know if you’re in the Northeast Ohio area and want to play buzzword bingo with this card:

Buzzword Bingo

We all love buzzword bingo! Right? right?

You can always check here for Clear Measure’s current openings. Even when we don’t have a listed position open, contact me anyway, because I firmly believe that a company should always be hiring. The best people don’t come along every day. That’s how I ended up working with Todd Ropog and Kevin Kuebler years ago. They were the right people to join NimblePros. 

I Joined Clear Measure

I am just about to finish up my second month on the Clear Measure team, and I am still very impressed with what this team has built considering how young the company is. I’ve known Jeffrey Palermo, one of Clear Measure’s founders, for plenty of years, and I decided to jump at the chance to work with him and his team. It is an opportunity that I could not pass on.

Role Change

Many developers who have worked with me in the past are excited to learn that I am now getting to write a lot more code than I did before, since I’ve stepped out of a leadership position and have taken on a Principal Software Engineer role with Clear Measure.

I am looking forward to the chance to delve back into the world of coding more. I’ve been able to write quite a bit of code while leading my teams, but this will give me the chance to get back to what I love. I’d been looking for a chance to make this change back to development for a while. I don’t expect that anyone can keep me permanently out of a leadership role, but I am in the industry for the development.

I’ve been leading development teams for Steve Smith and Michelle Smith for quite a few years, while we were running NimblePros and while we were Telerik Services. Easily the most difficult decision I’ve made in my entire career has been to part ways with them, primarily because it seems like such a big mistake to stop working with them. I am sure that this is not the last time I will work with those two. In fact, I am already discussing some plans for a side project with Steve.

Diving in Head First

I’ve been extremely impressed with the speed at which I was able to start writing code with Clear Measure. Many others are impressed to learn that I was building and running a solution in my first hour at Clear Measure. That’s just awesome.

Additionally, since Clear Measure had just started the project, I was able to get things running the way I wanted them to. The project is running under continuous integration and is a derivative of this Iteration Zero project. Letting the new guy run loose like that was something I was very happy about. In fact, the entire company seems to be based around the idea that people will make good choices when given the chance. I agree!

Two Dimensional Brendan

Now that I am working remotely, my team primarily sees me through a webcam. That’s certainly a change! I am a big proponent of having a team that is co-located, but for the right team you make exceptions. I think Clear Measure considers me the exception, and I consider them the exception. I’m just glad that we can agree on the situation.

I went from being in spaces like these:

Team Room 1

Notice the close proximity and lots of pair programming. No walls and everyone is constantly able to share information and ideas.

Team Room 2

In these buildings:


Yep those two buildings are what I like to call “The NimblePlex”. NimblePros shifted around quite a bit between these two buildings over the years. I had 4 different offices while I was in those buildings! Long stories to explain all of those!

Now I am using this desk:


It works pretty well for me. I made sure to get one that was for work and one that wasn’t. I am currently seated about 5-6 feet to the left of where I sit there. That’s important to me, having that separation.

For anyone paying attention to these pictures, I’ve got a Software Craftsmanship calendar on my desk, a Pluralsight mouse pad, an ASP Alliance coaster, and that’s a stack of books in the reflection. Can you identify the books? If you have a copy of the Software Craftsmanship Calendar, you might recognize three stars from this year’s calendar!

I did not expect to be working from home at this point, but it’s been interesting. I am able to have much better lunches than I did before. I now take 20 minutes to prepare and eat a salad most days, and I am watching Star Trek on Netflix during that time. I take a full hour for my lunch break though, so I have time to finish the episode while running on a treadmill. It’s amazing how much more energy I’ve got in the afternoon with this routine. I cannot recommend it enough. In fact, if I do move back into an office, I am looking into having a treadmill there!

Going Forward

I am never one who is without goals. If anything, I would say that I have more goals than I could possibly achieve. I’ve always thought that a good thing, since it gives me direction.

I am working on and planning some Pluralsight courses, which hopefully will be out soon. I’ll keep you posted.

As I’m sure you figured out, I don’t mind working remotely. In fact, it’s got some benefits and has been going well. My next goal at Clear Measure (aside from the success of the company and the projects I work on) is to build up an extremely talented team around me. I’ve started that process already, and Rich Hildebrand recently joined our team up here.

2014 Software Craftsmanship Calendar

The 2014 Software Craftsmanship Calendar is now available for preorder!

If you were a fan of any of the previous Software Craftsmanship Calendars or just liked the posts about some of the months, you'll be glad to know that we continued making a new one. We are continuing to alternate between Good Practices and Bad Practices, so this year (being the 4th) is a calendar of anti-patterns.

Each month of this calendar shows something that you shouldn't do, but plays it off as a good thing. You'll also find an interesting, related quote and a definition of the anti-pattern on each month.

Go get your calendar today!

Silverlight 1.0 has been released!

I read every blog post Scott Guthrie writes, and I intend to keep it that way. In his most recent blog post he let me know about Silverlight's 1.0 release as well as the announcement that Silverlight will be formally supported for Linux. Silverlight has seemed quite impressive so far, and I had been disappointed about Microsoft's not supporting Linux as well. I am happy to learn that the project called "Moonlight" will be able to run on 3 different browsers in Linux; Firefox, Opera, and Konqueror. As a Linux user myself I am always disappointed in the lack of Linux support given by larger companies. Flash is not very compatible with Linux, so it is quite impressive to see Microsoft assisting in the development of Moonlight.

For those of you who do not know there is an implementation of the .NET Framework referred to as Mono. It is a project in the Linux world which allows .NET code to run in Linux. I've done some development using Mono, and I've even written ASP.NET pages in Mono. So far they've done well in replicating the features provided by for .NET developers.

I think many people are eagerly anticipating the Silverlight 1.1 release which has also been mentioned as the current project Scott Guthrie's team is working on.

I am happy to know that when I write code in Silverlight anyone on any of the main 3 Operating systems should be able to see the Silverlight. If Microsoft can get some big websites using Silverlight, most people across the Internet will have Silverlight very quickly.

I recommend checking out a lot of Microsoft's webpages. I've seen a few of them, and these new Silverlight sites are quite amazing.

Visual Studio 2008 JavaScript Intellisense!

For those of you who do not read Scott Guthrie’s Blog, you really should. I know that any time I need to write JavaScript I switch out of Visual Studio, but I will not have to with Visual Studio 2008. It is supposed to have much better support for JavaScript development. Even Intellisense. For anyone interested you should check out this recent blog entry from Scott Guthrie which gives a lot of cool information about Visual Studio 2008’s JavaScript Intellisense.

I can’t wait to start using VS 2008. It has a lot of great features I plan on getting a lot of use out of.