Brendan Enrick

Daily Software Development

Agile Resources - The Agile Actors

Agile development has a few roles that people will be playing. Those roles define certain responsibilities that the parties involved will need to take on. Each role serves an integral role in the development process.

Product Owner

This is the representative of the customer’s interests. The product owner is responsible for knowing the details of all the work that needs to be done. When a developer has a question about how something should work in the system the product owner is the one with the answer.

The big picture is maintained by the product owner, who will be there to remind everyone of the big picture as the project is being worked on. This role is vital to the development without a project. If you’ve ever worked on a project where the product owner was brought in at the beginning once and once at the end I am sure you know that things didn’t go well.

Knowing where the project is going and making sure it isn’t deviating from what is important cannot be stressed enough, and these are vital for the product owner.

Team Lead

Agile teams work very fluidly. During development, most team members are the same. The team lead has some extra responsibilities including: helping to resolve blocking and impeding issues, guiding stand ups, guiding retrospectives, guiding iteration planning sessions. I like the term “team lead”, because this person isn’t really the boss. This role is here to help guide the project and the progress. The leader is the person making sure that the agile process stays on the tracks.

The leader doesn’t make decisions. The leader helps keep everyone moving by clearing the path and making sure everyone sticks together.

Team Member

These are the people creating the application. The team lead is also one of these people. They will be breaking stories into tasks, estimating the size and difficulty of the stories, and working on the stories which create the application. If something needs to be fixed, created, or modified, these are the people who will be working on it.

Fluidity is the word to describe the development team. Each member of an agile team must wear multiple hats. The developers will be designing, developing, and testing the application throughout the process.

Agile Resources - Development Process Recurring Steps

Different processes are used to create software applications. Agile software development is about responding and embracing change. It is about working closely with the customer instead of the customer just saying what they want up front. Agile teams follow processes during development, but they’re flexible, quick processes which allow the continue to continue making advances.

Most agile processes involve some sort of iterative development. Iterating allows for quick changes in the allocation of developer resources, which means responding to changes when the response is needed. The following is a list of each iterating piece of the development process grouped by how often the step occurs.

Months

Releases – if you’re working on an application end users will need to update when you release then your releases will likely be done in terms of months. Releases will include collections of features as well as bug fixes. Planning a release means selecting the features you’ll want to complete within the release time period. This is not specifics, but is only a large scale decision of what features will be worked on most of the iteration. (This plan needs to be flexible as it will likely change.)

Weeks

Iterations – an iteration usually lasts one or two weeks and is the primary development cycle for the application. During an iteration planning meeting, the team and the product owner will collaboratively decide which stories will be completed within the iteration. Everyone will decide and commit to achieving these goals. Iterations short, planning session as well as a short retrospective at the end. This communication keeps the team on the same page and allows the process to change as needed.

Minor Releases – if your application allows for it, which means that your application doesn’t require an update on everyone’s computer, an update should be released with every iteration. Keeping releases small makes them a lot easier and less likely to cause problems.

Days

Standing Meeting – during this meeting no one should sit down. It should take only a few minutes, so there is no need to be sitting. This is a great time for everyone to let others know of their progress as well as their plans for the rest of the day. This is a great time to inform everyone of any issues as well as to get questions answered which have quick answers. These help keep everyone in the loop, so no members are left out.

Hours

Change Pair Programmers – I believe highly in pair programming. From what I’ve seen, it produces much higher quality code. The system works best when pairs are changed in terms of hours. The pair needs to work together long enough to avoid the costs of context switching and often enough that knowledge and technique is spread thoroughly in the application and the team.

Minutes

Unit Tests – I think everyone should be unit testing. These should be written all the time and you should be writing your next unit test within minutes of your previous one. These should be written quickly and easily. The challenge of unit testing is getting to a point where the testing is easy. Once writing tests is easy, you’re testing “the right way”.

Code Commits – commit your changes frequently. A lot can happen to a code base in an hour. Keep checking in frequently. It shouldn’t be so often that it impairs your work, but you really only want to be impacting a handful of files. Long periods between commits mean they’re large and difficult to manage. If you have to write more than one thing in the description of your commit, you’re probably committing too much. (The Single Responsibility Principle should apply to code commits as well.)

Agile Resources – Velocity and Capacity Explained

Velocity and Capacity are two terms commonly used for determining how much work a team can perform in a given amount of time. Agile development is customer-focused development, and as such it is important to know for small periods of time how much a team can achieve.

Determining Velocity

A teams velocity is an estimate of how much work it usually completes in a given time period. The figure is based on how much work a team has completed recently. Velocity is usually measured in either hours of points. Agile teams determine how they will be measuring the time and difficulty of tasks, whether they use a point system or a number of hours is up to them.

Determining Capacity

A teams capacity is an estimate of how much work it can complete in a given time period. The figure is based on the ideal amount of time available within the team. This number is created by adding together the sum total of ideal hours each developer has for the project in the given time period. If there are two developers each working 24 hours/week then the weekly capacity is 48 hours. If you’re using points and not hours you can convert that into points.

In Iterations

An iteration is a period of time where an agile team is going to move through every stage of the development process all the way from planning to deploying an update. Agile teams tend to do one or two week long iterations. Velocity and capacity are used to help teams commit to a certain amount of work to be accomplished during an iteration. Since the team knows how much they’ve completed previously and their potential capacity for work, they are able to determine if the workload they’re agreeing to is reasonable.

Author’s Note: It is important to customize agile development based or your team and the needs of your team. The content here is a suggestion based on what has worked well for in the past.

Quick Silverlight Tip: Looking at the code

Silverlight is a great technology, and one thing that really makes it a treat to work with is the ease with which one can access the code inside the XAP file. Yes, this means that someone can look at your code,  SO DON’T PUT ANYTHING SECURE IN THERE! I took Jeff Blankenburg’s Click the Button contest.

So for a while I though Jeff had tricked me on that puzzle until I opened up the XAP file and looked at the source code. On the last page of the Silverlight you see this screen.

Level 12

So what’s the big deal? Well, the level before it was titled “Level 10”, so I figured Jeff was trying to pull a fast one and there was more to this seemingly innocent page. So I tried to find how to get beyond this level 12 to the real one. I eventually took the smart route, and I opened .NET Reflector and pointed it at the DLL file for the contest.

How did I do that you ask? Here are some quick steps for looking at the source code of a Silverlight application.

Step 1: Download the .xap file. View the source of the HTML page or look at the NET tab in FireBug to get the .xap file and download it.

Step 2: Rename the file to .zip and open it. Yes, a .xap is really a .zip neat huh?

Step 3: Unzip the file and find the dll you’re looking for. In my case it is called “ClickTheButton.dll”

Step 4: Open up .NET Reflector and open up that dll file.

NewDllInReflector

Step 5: After examining the dll you’ll be able to see all of the code. In this case I can see that Jeff actually has 13 levels he created for this application.

You now have a choice to make. You can ask Jeff Blankenburg what happened to the other puzzles or just go and take a look at the code and see which levels are missing.